Occassional cycle lanes isn't enough, we need a Transport Plan

In 2018, Transport accounted for 44% of all carbon emissions in Jersey. As we don't have large, long-distant lorries, we don't have many types of transport that cannot be de-motorised or made electric. We need a coherent, holistic plan, that specifically looks to cut our transport-related emissions in Jersey.

For me, this means:

- Electric buses (this is just obvious for an island this size)

- Much as I love my old motorbikes, we need to consider policies that discourage ownership of petrol or diseal vehicles (such as an efficiency-related yearly tax)

- We also need to support the availability of electric vehicles and related charging equipment, perhaps through subsidies, or perhaps through supporting access to wider, car sharing, schemes (ideally ones that let you put a surfboard on the vehicle!)

- Commuter cycle lanes across key, population-dense, locations (Gorey to St Aubins, as well as up to Red Houses and up to Highlands / Hautlieu / JCG / Vic / DLS / Beaulieu). If this means using a lane of Victoria avenue, then that is fine by me.

- Policies which incentivise non-motorised or low-emission modes of transport, such as priority to cyclists (if it is faster to cycle to work than to drive, then people might be more inclined to cycle).

- Support (where appropriate) to help families acquire bicycles / e-bikes.

Why the contribution is important

A clear Transport Plan is key to helping islanders understand the ultimate objective (i.e. a reduction of transport-related emissions to less than 20% of all Jersey emissions etc.) and the steps being taken to reach it.

The strategic process will engage islanders and avoid any obvious mistakes with regard to disproportionate cost implications for the vulnerable, inapproriate choices (such as cycle path materials, widths, locations), and will enable Jersey to incorporate expertise relating to successful models, such as Amsterdam and Geneva.

A clear Plan will bring greater confidence in decisions to build cycle lanes, as if it is obvious how they all connect and that this system will be an efficient option for many people going to work, there might be greater support and engagement.

It will also help people to understand how potentially unpopular aspects - perhaps making the St Clement's inner-road one way to create a cycle lane that connects Gorey to town... or policies that involve tax - are actually a justifiable and well-thought through part of building a better island, for everyone, overall.

by JerseyFleur on February 02, 2021 at 12:51PM

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Comments

  • Posted by Jerriaisjanne February 02, 2021 at 18:12

    I agree. A transition of transport modes is necessary for a number of reasons and not just because of the climate crisis. The only way to solve Jersey's congestion is by having people move from cars to bicycles and public transportation, as adding more lanes to roads which are already to narrow for cars.

    The only exemption to this would in my opinion be the Beaumont area, where the sheer number of cars is already too high and this impacts on public transport provision. A long-term goal to increase capacity, such as by providing a bypass near the coast (although that would require somehow extending the land there) could be beneficial to provide a bus friendly route through the area.

    As that is off topic, I will return to the main topic, which is active travel. I will make my own post about my ideas as I have quite a few, but I'll take this comment to respond to your ideas.

    "Much as I love my old motorbikes, we need to consider policies that discourage ownership of petrol or diseal vehicles (such as an efficiency-related yearly tax)"

    I definitely agree with this. A tax related to vehicle emissions would be a positive step in reducing car usage. By charging people more for shorter journeys, you would encourage people to take shorter journeys by bike or walking.

    "Commuter cycle lanes across key, population-dense, locations (Gorey to St Aubins, as well as up to Red Houses and up to Highlands / Hautlieu / JCG / Vic / DLS / Beaulieu). If this means using a lane of Victoria avenue, then that is fine by me."

    It's positive already to see that the plan is to have St Aubin's and Gorey linked by safe off-road cycle routes. Development on this needs to be accelerated using funds from the Climate Emergency Fund. This means the Government should publish a plan detailing how the entire route from the end of the cycle path at Grouville Common all the way to Liberation Square will be improved to make it safer for cyclists. Furthermore, a plan to improve the quality of the route from the Railway Walk to Liberation Square with plans for the dates each will be delivered by (with an aim to have it all delievered by 2025). This would link together the island's population centres with attractive routes for cyclists. I have some specific ideas about this that I will detail in my own post to this board.

    I will note there is no need to lose a lane of Victoria Avenue. Doing so would be harmful to the residents in the First Tower area that would have to suffer increased traffic. We all saw the traffic around Mont Felard when one of the three lanes along that Avenue section was closed and closing lanes on the Avenue would lead to gridlock spreading back into town and harming emergency response times. This can be provided by reclaiming space used for parking currently as public space (and reproviding the parking elsewhere for people accessing the beach and the properties around First Tower).

    "- Policies which incentivise non-motorised or low-emission modes of transport, such as priority to cyclists (if it is faster to cycle to work than to drive, then people might be more inclined to cycle)."

    I think it would be unneccesarily harmful to make it take longer to drive than cycle on interparish scale distances. This won't necessarily benefit cyclists, while providing proper good infrastructure (such as through cycle tracks, green lanes and modal filters) would.
  • Posted by BigAirport February 02, 2021 at 18:23

    I used to cycle to work for decades from about 1980 to 2010. My co-workers thought I was a bit strange as I was not put off by the weather, wind, rain, snow ice etc. It was healthy, stress reducing, and much cheaper than using a car in a traffic jam and then having to pay to park it. I am not sure why we need cycle lanes as I was perfectly safe on the roads. I need to allow bikes to come to the front at traffic lights as many European countries do by keeping an area in from of the cars clear for them to filter to. We now have great electric assist bikes and that makes cycling much easier for all to use. Why do we not have under cover cycle parking? We allow cars to be under cover but insist bicycles must get wet all day and rust. I was educated at Victoria College and the cycle sheds were full of hundreds of bikes as if in Amsterdam but now how many parents insist on driving their children to school causing traffic chaos and pollution in the process. Are the roads here such a deathtrap or are parents need to just get on with it. What happened to the National Cycling Proficiency scheme that I attended before I cycled to school so I was safe and educated on the road?
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